The Egg

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I played a gig on saturday with the live dance band The Egg.  Well, it was more of a scrambled Egg as Maff Scott, the awesome drummer and twin brother of frontman/synth guy Ned was on holiday in Turkey plus bass maestro, the unbelievably funky Paul Marshall was similarly unavailable hence my inclusion along with stand in drummer Tony.

The Egg are genuine legends of the underground music scene not just here in the UK but due to numerous global jaunts, worldwide too.  The band formed in Oxford in the 1990’s and were one of the first bands I’d ever seen play electronic techno but as a typical four piece bass/drums/guitar/keys affair.  I remember thinking when rave music was taking over in the early 90’s that bands would have to learn to play this thumping dance style in order to compete with the rash of DJs popping up everywhere.  The Egg not only mastered this but also  developed their own highly funky take on the genre that proved irresistible with the countless audiences they performed to.  The Egg had a hit record in 2006 with the David Guetta mashup Love Don’t Let Me Go (Walking Away) which reached number 3 in the UK and charted all across Europe.

I was fortunate enough to first play with The Egg in a backstage jam at the 1998 Glastonbury Festival playing to a packed marquee called The Green Room.  This venue was exclusively for the crew and performers of the circus and cabaret fields and is one of many backstage areas that are real hidden gems of the festival as the parties stretch out way until dawn.  I sang improvised vocals with them at that particular performance which also included sometime Egg member Jerry on guitar.  Jerry was coincidentally the guitarist I played with on Saturday too.

I saw The Egg play the following year at Glastonbury and this was during their number phase where all the band members dressed in pure white other than the humorous individual numbers ablaze on each members top!

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Over the past few years I have performed a few times with the band when Paul has been unavailable and it is a thrill partly because Maff is an amazing drummer and Ned is constantly pulling surprises out of his deep bag of party tricks such as vocoding, stylophone and the most bizarre samples.  One of the coolest aspects of the band is the lack of sequenced clock.  Maff essentially controls the timecode to which Ned’s various arpeggios and loops are synchronised to.  This means that if Maff wants to speed up or slow down, everything else essentially follows him.  This gives an organic and free flowing quality to their live performances which avoids the staticness of being slaved to a computer clock and allows the band to create arrangements on the fly reacting much like a DJ to the audiences moods and whims.

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Filed under Music Tech, Performances

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