Tag Archives: cutting edge

Korg Gadget – Mobile Multiple Synthesizer Studio

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Korg created a real surprise today when they launched their new iOS music app Gadget at the Namm 2014 winter show. It is a music production suite of 15 “gadgets’ within a sequencing environment. I had just returned from a late night rehearsal when I read about the new launch. I immediately downloaded it and thought it would be great fun to film a first impression of it without any preparation. Below is the first part of my first look:

And here is the second part:

In order to make this little film, I downloaded a piece of software for my Mac called Reflector. It allows you to use your Mac as an Airplay client for your iPad, therefore able to record the screen. I hadn’t used it before so I apologise for the audio glitching which I think was due to that.

I had written a full review following my first impression but sadly due to incompetence on my part, I lost it all ūüė¶ If I can be bothered I’ll get around to writing it again.

*Update* I decided to do a follow up video after I’d had a further investigation of the app. ¬†Here it is:

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Cubase 7.5 – the latest version of this vintage DAW

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Cubase has received a new update today so I thought I’d write up some notes whilst waiting for it to download. ¬†I think Steinberg’s servers are under heavy demand!

This update takes Cubase up to v7.5 but beware it is a paid upgrade (49‚ā¨/49$). ¬†If you happened to have upgraded to version 7 since October 15th then you can get this update for free but for other users of v7 there is that fee. ¬†Although I always look forward to a Cubase .5 release, some people complain bitterly about these halfway house paid upgrades – i.e It is expected that you’d pay for a major v6 to v7 type upgrade but to pay for an intermediate step? ¬†I think this is Steinberg’s business model now as evinced by the same strategy when v6. came out with a similar fee. ¬†It could be argued that this is a way to ensure that Steinberg manages to get a yearly revenue from it’s customers with a major version dropping every two to three years and a half version in between. ¬†Well, what does this update offer and is it worth paying for or should users just simply hold out for the next big update which will include all these intermediate features anyway?

Well I guess the headline features  are:

  • TrackVersions:¬†Playlists for creating, renaming and managing parallel variations of tracks

This looks highly interesting to me for a bunch of reasons.  I think sometimes its nice to come back to a song and have a fresh crack at say the vocals but rather than creating a new track, you can simply create a new track version which flows through all the same processing and automation.  You can then simply toggle between your two versions.  Both versions of which could contain lots of comping.  The great thing with track versions is that it applies to most of the track types and this is especially interesting with the chord track.  If you have your midi tracks (and monophonic audio tracks) set to follow the chord track, changing a chord will mean that all the tracks will change their note contents to follow suit.  This could mean that if you wrote a song within a minor key you could create a track version in a major key and then toggle the version and have the whole song change.  This has huge repercussions for composers who want to try out different keys for singers, different moods for film makers etc

  • Track visibility:¬†Shows only the tracks you want to see in the Project window

This is another very nice and a “why didn’t they think of that before?” feature. ¬†This lets you select any tracks on the arrangement page and make them the only visible ones. ¬†You have been able to do this with the mixer as of v7 so it’s nice to see it be part of the arrangement page. You can also link the arrangement page and the mixer now so they both look the same. ¬†Examples of this could be just showing the drums tracks. ¬†You can conveniently save track view presets so viewing and editing large and complex projects will become significantly easier.

  • Instrument (t)rack 2.0:¬†Supports multi-outputs and multi-inputs, and merges instrument tracks with the Instrument Rack

Again a sensible streamlining of workflow.  Prior to the invention of instrument tracks, to host a VST plugin, one had to put the plugin in the rack, and then create a midi track and assign it to that.  Instrument tracks sped up the process by just creating an instrument track and midi track combined but lost the ability to have a single VST instrument output multiple audio outputs, this new combining of both approaches is definitely welcome.  Put an instrument in the rack and it instantly creates a midi track routed to it or create an instrument track like before and the instrument appears in the rack automatically.

  • HALion Sonic SE 2:¬†Giving you tons of fresh new sounds plus a totally new synth

Since Steinberg was bought by Yamaha some years ago, the Halion synths have benefitted from Yamaha’s considerable experience and feature sounds from some of their synths (Motif range I believe). ¬†It will be interesting to see what these sounds are like (a separate download from 7.5)

  • Groove Agent SE 4:¬†With over 120 drum kits and smart user interface for creating beats and hits in no time

This looks like a radical overhaul of the rather simplistic version of Groove Agent in v7. ¬†They have obviously taken a good look at Native Instruments Maschine (see my feature here) and also Akai’s long running MPC range and have tried to incorporate some of those workflow ideas. ¬†It has a huge slew of new features on board including pattern editor and a suite of dedicated effects. ¬†There are also new drum kits to play with.

  • New construction kits:¬†Adding flavor to your productions and giving you new song ideas

Could be interesting to some. ¬†They are essentially 30 complete songs made up of midi files that are assigned to the various synths and drum machines within Cubase. ¬†The idea is that they give you starting blocks to inspire. ¬†I’m not sure it’s the sort of thing I’d use but maybe good to build tracks in a hurry and then fiddle with the content later.

  • LoopMash FX:¬†For real-time modern-style breaks, tape-stops, stutters and more

Ah this looks fun. ¬†Fans of Izotope’s innovative stutter edit will like this as you can apply those peculiar twists and turns and beat repeats on any material now not just the loops within the previous Loop Mash plug in. ¬†Assign a midi tracks output to the track with Loop Mash FX inserted on and then have some serious fun making your audio jump through hoops!

  • REVelation:¬†Super-smooth and silky-sounding algorithmic reverb that brings back the memories of those old fancy hardware units

We are getting a bit spoilt now with this sumptuous collection of new stuff. ¬†A good quality algorithmic reverb would have cost at least double the update price so this alone makes the ‚ā¨49 cost seem a bit like a bargain. ¬†This reverb is a bit overdue mind as the previous algorithmic reverb Roomworks (and Roomworks SE) have been sounding (!) a bit long in the tooth and compared to the shinier, newer convolution based reverb, Reverence, it has seemed a bit lacking. ¬†I am looking forward to pitting this against my current favourite algorithmic reverb Aether

  • Magneto 2:¬†Adding warmth to your tracks

Aha Magneto returns! ¬†Long time Cubase users will remember the original Magneto, a tape emulation plugin, from way back. ¬†It’s nice to see it return in hopefully an even better sounding incarnation. ¬†Interestingly it appears in two formats within Cubase 7.5, as a vst plugin or as a component within the channel strip which makes a lot of sense for those who want to run it on every track to emulate a tape based project.

  • VST Connect SE 2¬†(available in Cubase 7.5 only): Unique remote recording plug-in now with MIDI data transmission

I am still yet to try this which came out with v7 and allows musicians all over the world to essentially become plugins within an input track ! The new version allows not just audio but midi to be recorded from your connected contributors.

  • Transient navigation:¬†Tab to transients on audio events in the Project window thanks to the new instant hitpoint navigation

This has been in Cubase for a long time but now takes place automatically without you having to go into the audio editor and set it manually. Also being able to do this within the arrange page will speed up editing significantly.

 

If you are a user of the score editor, you may be pleased to learn that you now have a whole wealth of midi editing facilities within the score editor now rather than having to tediously swap to the key editor every time you want to say quantize or other such midi edit operation.

I will return to this post once I have completed this download.

 

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Maschine Studio with Logic Pro X using iPad Air as remote controller

More music tech goodness to chew on folks! I decided to make a short film showing the integration of a bunch of new things, Logic Pro X, the iPad Air plus the Native Instruments Maschine Studio running the V2.0 software. They play really well together!

Logic Pro X

I have made no attempt to hide my distaste of the music software Logic in the past, perhaps because I am a long time Cubase user it is ingrained in me but also I just think that for years it has really lagged behind other DAW’s too. Well, I have changed my mind, slightly! I had to buy Logic due to a collaboration with an artist I am working with. It just made sense to do this rathe than both of us lose time with trying to convert the projects back and forth between our systems. Besides this artist, there is another that I will be working with soon who is also on Logic X too. I had previously bought (against my wishes!) Logic 9 which I hated with a passion so I wasn’t too thrilled at the prospect of spending more time in Logic land. We’ll I need not of worried too much as Logic X is a huge improvement over its predecessor. The much needed facelift has finally banished those tiny menus and the relocation of things like the transport bar to the top has made the workflow more intuitive. Track stacks bring a Reaper like function when you group a bunch of tracks into a folder, that folder gains a dedicated fader – are you listening Cubase? There is now a bass amp emulation called Bass Amp Designer and low and behold when I first instantiated (correct term!) the plug in I was faced with a graphical reproduction of my classic old bass amp a Mesa boogie 400+ and my old cab too, the quirky 1516. I have never seen these emulated before and I was really impressed with how it sounded. There is the much talked about Drummer plug in which lets you choose drummer by personality (?) and also you now have a basic Melodyne like functionality called Flex pitch which I have yet to try amongst countless other improvements.

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My old bass amp amp now in Logic Pro X – Mesa Boogie 400+

Logic Remote

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Logic Remote showing mixer

The show stopper for me though is the clever Logic Remote app for iPad. Borrowing heavily from the iPad version of GarageBand, this controller allows you to mix, edit and perform using a very intuitive control surface. Interestingly they have taken the Smart instruments idea and made them in to controllers for the Logic instruments. I marvelled at the design of these a few years back when they debuted on the iPad GarageBand so they are welcome here. These essentially let you turn the iPad into various types of midi controller, a guitar simulator, drum pads and chord strips on top of a regular piano keyboard that can also have notes stripped away to display only in key notes. Cleverly these follow whatever the region’s key is which is set in the main info panel at the top of Logic X. I have been banging on for nearly a year now about the wonderful chord track in Cubase, well Logic gets a halfway house now with the arrangement track combined with being able to set keys for regions. In practice I have found the Logic Remote to be the most robust and reliable of all the different iPad based control surfaces I have tried. Probably to do with some secret voodoo that Apple have going on that is closed to all and sundry however it works very well and maintains connection quickly after bringing the iPad out of sleep. This was the killer in the past for other controllers as it would often mean that you would have to jump through a few hoops to get things synchronised again. One feature I particularly like (which the Cubase Equivalent, IC also has) is the ability to create shortcuts and macros and give them dedicated buttons.

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Logic Remote showing shortcuts page


Maschine Studio Intergration

You may have read my Maschine Studio and software review or saw my Sonic State review. If not you can find them here so I won’t go over old ground as to what it is needless to say though that you can run Maschine software as an Audio Unit (AU) within Logic X. The cool thing with doing this is that the Smart Instrument controllers operate on the Maschine too via Logic’s own routing. I didn’t have to set anything up, they just worked. This is very cool as it allows for Ableton Live Push like functionality which was left out of Maschine v2.0. This means you can use the aforementioned preset scales on the sounds within Maschine. I try and demonstrate this in my video so I recommend watching that to see it in practice although the tune I make is quite meh!

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Samplr – My favourite iPad app!

My favourite iPad app Samplr has just had a great new update taking it to version 1.3.  This app just keeps on getting better and better!

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(umm this image is of an earlier version but more or less looks like this!)

Here is a video I filmed today to investigate the new mode.  I only used my little Yamaha Guitalele   (six string ukelele tuned like a guitar but a fifth up Рbottom string is a B).  You can see in the video that Samplr lets you do many creative things with the samples you make on it.

Marco Alonso is the Spanish developer of Samplr and he has some quite interesting history. ¬†He was largely responsible for the graphics and interface of the Reactable synthesiser. ¬†This is that peculiar system that Bj√∂rk made famous. ¬†It is a physical table that you move blocks around on, when the blocks come near to others they “react” and generate sound or affect the sound of others. Reactable is now also available as an iPhone/iPad app though I think it has lost quite a bit of its appeal in the transition. I was not surprised to learn about Marco as there had to be someone of significant talent to come up with this beauty.

Modes

Why I particularly like this app is because it really uses the multitouch idiom of the iPad really well.  It is essentially a 6 track sampler that lets you manipulate the samples by touching them directly and utilising one of the 7 different modes.  The different modes are:

1.Slicer – this lets you insert any amount of markers which essentially split the sample into a bunch of triggers. This is great for playing melodies. If you sample a scale played on any instrument and then place the start markers immediately before each note. Chords work extremely well in this mode too.

2.Looper Рthis lets you set up to three adjustable loops within the same sample.  As I mentioned, the touch interface is amazing, it is so intuitive and fast to get stuff looping. There are these circles which are very easy to manipulate.  They appear in the different modes and I think are a strong design factor.  You are never in any doubt as to what they do, it is so clear to see. There is a sustain button which works in every mode and lets you lock your last touch in place.  You can place three different sustains on at any time and they are represented by three coloured dots next to the recording length indicator.  There is an x next to the dots which serves as a sustain cancel, cleverly allowing each sustain to be taken off in turn.

3.Bow Р The bow lets you touch a portion of your sample and then it loops it very quickly producing quite a smooth textured sound that as you slide around can make for great expressive instrument.  Again works great on chords and scales. The analogy of a violin bow is actually quite useful here in conjuring up ideas of how to approach this mode.  Imagine being able to bow a sample of glass being smashed?

4.Tape and Scratch¬†– previously these existed as separate modes and were easily my least favourite modes although they do have some cool uses so it makes sense that they are now combined into the same mode. ¬†The tape mode lets you set off the sample at different speeds either forwards or backwards. I should mention at this point that whichever mode you are in, the volume of the sample will depend on how high up on the sample you touch. ¬†This makes Samplr a very expressive instrument as you can vary the dynamics easily and logically. ¬†This works with any notes that you have held with the sustain button meaning that any note or loop’s volume can be manipulated by sliding the circle up or down. ¬†Fabulous! ¬†The other sub mode, Scratch (enabled by pressing the record deck icon) lets you wickky wiccky scratch your sample!

5.Arpeggiator РThis is one of the new features of v1.3 and is extremely cool.  Here you can touch various segments of your sample (as defined with the markers) and it will repeat them at the project tempo and based on the musical value ranging from whole notes (semibreves) to 32 nd notes (demisemiquavers).  There are also different arp modes Рup, down, up and down, random and note order. Again the sustain (or latching) feature really comes into its own here allowing for note sequences to be played but also manipulated both in volume and note choice. It was upon playing with this mode that I was inspired to make my little video and this blog entry.  Truly inspiring!

6.Keyboard – Just very simply allows you to play the sample in pitches across a graphical representation of a keyboard. ¬†This is not the most interesting mode as we have seen this kind of thing since the Casio SK1 back in the early 80’s but it is handy none the less to have it here. ¬†Each of the modes have a few options that let you tailor the settings. ¬†Here we have attack quantisation and legato mode. ¬† Also each mode has a very simple attack and release envelope which although basic it is great to have and super quick to operate.

7.Loop Player – the final mode has no touch controls and is just a very simple loop player which you can use if you wanted to play over a backing track or existing loop for instance.

Sampling

Sampling is so easy and great fun here.  All you do is choose whether you want to sample from the mic or if you want to resample the mix. Resampling is such a laugh as you can get all sorts of nonsense going on then sample it and turn it into something completely bizarre!  I have found that sampling from the built in mic can give surprisingly good results.  It is quite sensitive and with no gain control you have to position the iPad at a decent enough distance away from what you are sampling to stop it from clipping. I have used it successfully with the my Samson Gomic which is a cool little gizmo that works effectively with a CCK (camera connection kit) but to be honest the built in mic gets good results.  I have been promising myself an Apogee Mic at some point as I think that would be the perfect mono mic for Samplr as it has a clip indicator and an adjustable gain wheel plus crucially a very low noise floor.

Effects

Samplr also contains a truly wonderful effects section which is extremely generous as it gives you not only a multi effect for each of the 6 sample slots but a master effect too.  So each multi effect can be a distortion, filter, modulator, delay or reverb all at the same time if you wish and has possibly the fastest and most immediate implementation of a multi effect I have ever seen.  You simply touch the icon that represents the effect to enable it then use the kaoss pad like touch square for instant results.  The filter for instance can be either a low pass or high pass.  Touch the bottom right and the filter becomes a high pass, drag your finger to the right and it morphs into a low pass, drag upwards for resonance.  Brilliantly simple but highly effective.  All the effect modes have this simple approach and are all the more useful because of it. Seldom with this app are you left wanting more functionality such is its appealing design ethos.

Recording and looping 

Each of the six samples have a dedicated looper and can be set to record any length loops independently of each other. ¬†This is cool if for instance you have a short four bar loop on sample slot 1 and an eight bar pad on slot 2 etc. The master stroke here though is the loopers don’t record the sound but what your fingers are doing. ¬†This means that you can actually change the mode that the sample is operating in and you don’t lose the loop its just does a different thing. ¬†For instance if you were using the Bow to sustain on a small portion of the sample and then switched to the slicer, this would release the sample so it continues to play then jump back to bow mode and returns to the sustaining sound. ¬†This has interesting performance potential. I haven’t really mentioned how good Samplr is at manipulating imported drum beats too but really my interest lies more in looking around me for sounds and exploring melodic possibilities. Also now with v1.3 ¬†You can sync Samplr to a midi clock although I have yet to try this. ¬†Samplr also supports Audiobus so you can use it as both an instrument in apps like Cubasis and Garageband but also you can use it in the record position so you can sample compatible apps directly to it. Audioshare and AudioCopy are also supported.

Summary

So as you can see I am extremely fond of this app and it is my current favourite iPad app deposing previous top dog Thumbjam! ¬†I think that it displays a very forward thinking approach to intuitive design and rewarding user experience and just begs you to explore the creative potential it offers. ¬†If you are interested in music making, sound design or just messing around with cool toys, you owe it to yourself to check this app out. ¬†If you have an iPad it is a no brainer at ¬£6.99/$9.99! If you don’t have an iPad then there is a very good argument to get one just for this app it’s that good! ¬†Find it here.

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Maschine Studio and software v2.0 review

 

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Introduction

Maschine, Native Instruments popular beat making and sampling software/hardware combo is under going a major revamp.  Not only is there a new version 2 of the software which is backwards compatible with all previous hardware units, NI are also launching a top of the range hardware controller in the Maschine Studio.  I was fortunate enough to receive one early in time for my review for the ace music technology site SonicState.com.  Below is a link to my review.

Maschine Software Version 2.0

The software is both Mac and PC compatible. It is apparently a ground up rewrite and  I’m pleased to say that finally the software utilises multicore cpu’s and is far less processor intensive as a result.

The Headline new features are side chaining, unlimited groups, unlimited plugins, arranger timeline and my favourite, new drum synth models.  On top of this list there are countless more improvements.  After using the software for a few days on my Mk1, I was struck by how although it still works in a very familiar way, the new features just make sense and you won’t find yourself facing a steep learning curve you’ll be knocking out banging beats in a jiffy.

The Browser and Library

Lets first have a look at the greatly enhanced browser.

So browsing even on the Mk 1 has been radically overhauled and is swifter and more predictable. A major shift in the way it works is the dropping of the confusing modules approach and now adopts an altogether more easily understood channel and plugin terminology.  A comprehensive tag based browser on screen lets you narrow down selections from the huge library of 8 gigabytes including 445 drum kits, 388 multisampled instruments, 403 sliced loops and 8627 one shot samples.  It also includes all the presets from any other Native Instruments plugins you have installed. Apart from the presets, pressing shift and browse lets you select any of the internal plugins in a vanilla state or any VST/AU/AAX/RTAS plugins that you have installed.  All NI plugins have a nice graphical overview which aids to visual recognition and is an appealing touch.

Drum Synths

There are now five different drum synths built in РKick, Snare, Hihat, Tom and Percussion.  These are not samples but clever Reaktor based drum modellers which bring an astonishing amount of electronic or acoustic sounding drum sounds to the party.  Here is the kick synth.  We can flip through the different engines and as we do so the available editing parameters also change.  I found by layering two or more of these kicks together, the range of tones will probably mean you will spend less time browsing the gigantic collection of samples and seek out truly original sounds which in my book is a much more satisfying pursuit.  All the drum synth engines have useful amount of parameters with the biggest change coming from the engines themselves.  There are different amount of engines available per drum type:

8 kicks, 9 snares, 3 hihats 3 toms and 3 Percussion engines.

It could be argued that these alone are worth the 99‚ā¨/99$ upgrade. ¬†In the time I have spent playing with them it makes the Maschine unquestionably the best sounding digital drum machine I have ever used.

Along with these drum synths Maschine 2.0 now comes bundles not only with NI’s veritable bass wobble master Massive (as has been available since version 1.8) but now comes with Prism, Scarbee Mk1 Electric Piano and the Solid Bus Compressor.  These are collectively known as Komplete Selection and rather than being cut down versions are the full products that have previously been available as full price plugins.

Mixing and Side Chaining

Fans of the macro controls will be pleased to learn that these are now available at all three levels РSound, Group and Master as opposed to just groups in the previous version.  These let you set up parameters for tweaking in a fairly swift manner and is much improved in my opinion. Also new as mentioned earlier is side chaining which along with multicore support must rank as the most requested feature.  To enable side chaining simply choose the input source on suitable effects to the output of the sound or group you wish to have modulate.  Very easy and effective.  We can also see the new plug in strip here which greatly improves visual recognition.  The new mixer view accessed on the software with shift+navigate gives a much clearer overview of the relative levels of all sounds and groups. Sadly as of yet they are not adjustable from the older hardware in this view.  Possible future update?

Song Arranging

As with the older version of Maschine, sequencing is based on creating scenes which are collections of patterns.  This approach has been much criticized in the past and I’m afraid much of that is still valid.  Scenes are rigid vessels whose length are governed by the longest pattern contained within.  Having patterns overlap scenes is impossible without complex copy and paste procedures although there is now a much welcome independent loop which can span different scenes.  If you move your cursor to the edge of the ruler you can drag the loop start and here for the loop end.  The loop reverts back to scene as soon as you press a scene button. There is no way to record realtime scene switching and again as before no way to automate mutes.  If you were hoping like me for a more Ableton Live approach with version 2.0 this aint it. Maschine is not a DAW, it is a pattern based drum machine and sampler and it pays to remember this.  One hugely useful feature mysteriously missing from the older versions does make an appearance here and that is screen follow. I used to find it incredibly annoying to have to switch to the navigation mode to adjust the on screen software so I could see what is going on, that is now fixed and is toggled either via the hardware or the software.

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Speaking of Ableton though, another much expected feature hasn’t made the cut either and that is predefined scales alà Push.  When you play musical notes on the sixteen pads they are always mapped chromatically. Sadly note repeat still doesn’t react to swing which will disappoint many. That may be addressed with an update with any luck. Also still no realtime timestretch either which is another much requested feature.

Software Summary

It should be said at this point that apart from a few small details, all of the new features are available to all members of the Maschine family , Mk1, Mk2, Mikro and the new Maschine Studio.  NI should be applauded for continuing support of the MK 1 which is now over four years old.  The new workflow ingeniously uses the existing hardware and is a definite and undeniable improvement.

Moving on now to the new Maschine studio.

Maschine Studio

Firstly lets say what is not.  It doesn’t feature an audio interface which seems odd especially at this price point especially compared to it’s nearest rival Akai’s MPC Renaissance which sports a significant amount of i/o. It does however feature three midi outs and one midi in plus two footswitch inputs.  The footswitches are currently mapped to play and record but we will see more options for those in the future. Native Instruments inform me that this was a conscious decision as this unit is very much geared at being used in studios which will probably have all the audio i/o catered for and to include a suitable audio interface would add significantly to the already high cost. This, is as you can see a very large unit and is not really geared at being an all in one live unit.  In fact finding a suitable bag or box to transport it safely in may prove to be tricky given its unusual dimensions.  An argument for the lack of audio interface could be that having a load of cable spaghetti attached may interfere with its attractive looks and limit its position within the studio.

The Studio also doesn’t feature anything that you can’t achieve with the other models which is surprising given the £279 street price of the Mikro.  It does however offer a much more streamlined approach to Maschine based productions helped in no small manner by the large clickable illuminated jog wheel and those quite lovely high definition colour screens.  The design goal was to build a unit that you could lose yourself within and not have to look at a computer monitor and this it largely succeeds in.  Those displays show the various plugins with appealing graphics and although they look like touch screens, they are not and like the early models they rely on the 8 encoders plus the eight illuminated buttons for control. The displays also can show the arranger timeline and is especially adept at displaying sample waveforms.

Sitting in front of the Maschine Studio is a slightly daunting prospect though as it looks like it means business. It has such a presence and I have to say that the once elevated with the built in stand, the angle is just about perfect.  The stand legs may appear to be small but they are far from flimsy and the Maschine Studio impresses overall with its excellent build quality.

Pads

The pads themselves are the same ones from the MK 2 and very responsive and feature the same assignable colours.  They sit marginally lower into the hardware than on the Mk1 and are definitely more sensitive and predictable.  Also all the control buttons have that reassuring gentle click again introduced with the MK2’s.

Jog Wheel 

The jog wheel forms an integral part of the operation of the Studio and replicates some of the Mk2’s multifunction knob as well as many advanced editing operations.  6 illuminated words give an indication of the current function but with none lit it is a beat locked jog wheel.  Holding down a pad and clicking on the jog wheel lets you select between tune, swing and volume for that particular pad. One area where this wheel shines is in note editing.  In conjunction with the dedicated events button, it is now much easier to manipulate notes within a pattern.  Simply select the pad that corresponds to the note and then holding note allows you to repitch or hold nudge to adjust the timing.

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Level Control Section

The nifty level control section on the top right can be switched to monitor incoming audio plus various outputs including the new cue feature which will be of interest to live performers given that you can audition patterns and loops independently audio interface permitting.  Being able to select sound, group or master and having the rotary encoder beneath controlling the levels is very nicely implemented.  Pressing one of the four input input buttons changes the meter to monitor any inputs you have set up with your audio interface ready for sampling. above the section are the midi in and out indicator lights.

Mix View

The aforementioned mix view is well catered for on the Studio and is very easy to navigate due to those lovely screens.  A quick press of the dedicated mix button shows the volume and pan positions of each sound within a group (over two pages) and with a press of the back button can jump back to show the group levels.  Selecting a group with one of the illuminated group buttons followed by a click of the encoder then allows for level mixing and panning of the sounds of that particular group.  Very intuitive and satisfying.  In previous versions, mixing was a bit of a hit and miss affair so there’s plenty to like here.

Sample Editing

When it comes to sample editing, it is here that the dual displays come into their own.  The sampling process is largely the same as in the older software which is a good thing as that was a real strength of the Maschine.  It has however had a few tweaks such as being able to have a separate play range and selection range which makes for easier fades and inserting silence.  Here we can see that the left screen shows an overview of the whole sample whilst the right view can zoom and scroll.  A lovely feature is this sample mapping page where with minimal controls, its fast and easy to stack multiple samples with using just a few controls.

Summary

As with all Maschines, there is a definite sense of being behind an instrument but the Maschine Studio however with the new editing paradigm and those lovely screens, it enhances that experience to the next level.  The multi coloured LED’s may not be to everyones taste but it certainly helps with navigating your project and looks real purdy too in my opinion!  The big question as to is it worth upgrading to if you are already a Maschine owner?  I think it depends on how integral Maschine is to your studio workflow.  It doesn’t do anything you can’t do with the other models but it does do it in style! It is more enjoyable and a significantly faster experience. You definitely pay a premium for this and given the prices of the other models in the range, it does feel like a luxury product.  That being said though, if you are going to spend many hours within the Maschine world then you will really appreciate the thoughtfulness of the layout and design and that could be all the justification that you need!

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November 1, 2013 · 3:40 pm